Spring of Water Rises: A history of Orpington before 1900

I recently moved to Orpington, part of the London Borough of Bromley, on the border of London and Kent. Despite only becoming part of London in 1965, Orpington has a long and interesting history which has meant my original idea for this blog post has changed several times. Therefore this post only covers the history … More Spring of Water Rises: A history of Orpington before 1900

Angel in the castle? Queen Victoria and female sexuality in the nineteenth century.

‘How repressed were the Victorians?’ asks a recent article for The British Library. Writing a convincing case for a reassessment of Victorian sexuality, Dr Holly Furneaux challenges our assumptions about Victorian attitudes to sex, while considering the many ways in which theorists such as Michel Foucault have provided ‘new ways of understanding sex and sexuality … More Angel in the castle? Queen Victoria and female sexuality in the nineteenth century.

The Basingstoke Riots- Did the Salvation Army go too far! 

As part of my dissertation research into the football in Basingstoke in the late nineteenth century, I look at an event which perhaps has gone massively unnoticed in the modern era, but shook the walls of not only the Basingstoke local governance, but a problem for parliament as well. An image of the old Basingstoke … More The Basingstoke Riots- Did the Salvation Army go too far! 

Chocolate and the Quakers: Cadbury, Rowntree and Fry

The nineteenth century saw the rise of the three famous cocoa refining companies: Cadbury; J. S. Fry & Sons and Rowntree. What were unique about these companies were their Quaker roots. All three were run during this period by Quaker families although by the twentieth century these companies moved out of Quaker control. So why … More Chocolate and the Quakers: Cadbury, Rowntree and Fry

Edward Oxford, the man who almost killed Queen Victoria

As Britain longest reigning monarch, who would have thought that Queen Victoria’s life could have been ended so early in her reign in 1840? Only three years before had she been announced Queen on the turn of her eighteenth birthday, freeing herself from the control of her Controller of her household Sir John Conway. However … More Edward Oxford, the man who almost killed Queen Victoria