Candaules’ wife: What strong women mean in Herodotus’ Histories

  In Herodotus’ histories, the first wife to appear in the Histories is the unnamed wife and Queen of Candaules. Her namelessness may suggest the seriousness of the crime committed against her and sanctions her to stand as a respectable woman who was subjected to ridicule and shame induced by her husband’s actions. In this episode, … More Candaules’ wife: What strong women mean in Herodotus’ Histories

The Bronze Age: Homer

Bronze age, Homer, Mycenaean Civilisation. Do we learn anything from the Epic poetry that has held modern Western Civilisation since it was first sung? It is widely understood that the epics of Homer were composed in the late Bronze age. A feudal society ruled by a King in each region supported by an aristocracy shown historically … More The Bronze Age: Homer

The Kite Runner- Using Literature as a source for recent times

The post will look at the historical significance in Khaled Hosseini’s 2003 bestselling novel, The Kite Runner. The novel is a coming of age story focusing on Amir born into a Pashtun family in Afghanistan. Recently, as of Monday 10th July I went to watch the stage adaptation of it with another blogger- lauraljpotter. This … More The Kite Runner- Using Literature as a source for recent times

Collett, Wenche and Holberg: Figures of Norwegian Socialism

Please allow me to say that Oslo is a very artistic city and it is full of statues. Now I think I would have to spend a life time to take a picture of every single one. However, the city has commemorated in fine bronze casting some of the most influential cultural figures of Norwegian … More Collett, Wenche and Holberg: Figures of Norwegian Socialism

The History of the Little Cinder Girl

She’s been with most of us our whole lives, from watching a Disney adaptation, to the many variations Hollywood frequently churn out. And she’s been in the lives of people for a longer time still, from the French tale of little Cendrillon and the glass slipper and her pumpkin-turned-carriage, to the Brothers Grimm tale of lentils in the fire and … More The History of the Little Cinder Girl

The Great Gatsby: Class, Society and the American Dream

Possibly one of the most well-loved American novels, one of the most read and the most famous, Fitzgerald’s story of the booming ’20s in New York was the definition of a sleeper hit. Fitzgerald himself was long dead before he could see it appreciated and  its legacy is still being debated today. At its beginning, … More The Great Gatsby: Class, Society and the American Dream

Jane Austen as a Source for Eighteenth-Century and Regency Women

Jane Austen’s famous works have transcended the past two centuries and are as well-known now as they were when they were first published. Her novels on the lives of the Bennett sisters, the Dashwoods, and the famous Emma were popular in their own times and today, with film and TV adaptations especially popular since the … More Jane Austen as a Source for Eighteenth-Century and Regency Women

Alfonso Boix & El Cantar de Mio Cid: An Interview

Today I bring you an interview/self-reflection that I acquire from Alfonso Boix, a Spanish scholar, writing from Valencia, about his true love and passion: the epic Iberian romance El Cantar de Mio Cid. I met Alfonso some years ago and had long deep discussions about medieval literature, but he always manages to bring it all … More Alfonso Boix & El Cantar de Mio Cid: An Interview