What Is The Migration Period? – Part 1: The Romans and The Goths

Before I studied history I didn’t know a lot about certain periods, one of which was the apparent gap between the time of the Romans and the beginning of the true Medieval period. Eventually I found out that this is known as ‘The Migration Period’. This period of history is often overlooked in many places, … More What Is The Migration Period? – Part 1: The Romans and The Goths

Upper and Lower Class Tudor Fashion

Fashion, along other sociopolitical signifiers, has often been used as a sign of wealth throughout history, and Tudor times were no exception. Most trends were introduced by the royalty, who popularised them and produced the copycat effect, therefore propagating these tendencies amongst other of their same ranks, if not the whole of society. So today … More Upper and Lower Class Tudor Fashion

Britain was never the soul of Will-Why do Shakespeare’s plays gravitate abroad?

The Bard, The Sweet Swan of Avon, The Immortal, The National Bard of England and An Upstart Crow… Yet three quarters of his plays delved into the comical theatrics of lands further afield, Why? The Merry Wives of Windsor being the only play in contemporary setting was an intended piece of satire published in 1602 … More Britain was never the soul of Will-Why do Shakespeare’s plays gravitate abroad?

Egypt’s Pyramid Competitor- The Kush(y) Nubian Pyramids

In joining the designated theme of pre-modern non-European civilizations and the informal trend concerning pyramids which seems to have enveloped the blog, we must look no further than Sudan. A subject at first interesting for its similarities to its more infamous neighbor’s architectural style. On closer inspection and with the help of this post’s inspiration, … More Egypt’s Pyramid Competitor- The Kush(y) Nubian Pyramids

Sargon and Enheduana – A Powerful Akkadian Family

In a 1931 archaeological dig in Nineveh, in Northern Mesopotamia, a life-sized copper head was found by Reginald Thompson and Max Mallowan. This head signalled a change from the usual hieratic sculpture style that denoted the Sumerians. It was also noted that this head did not show any of the usual signs of divinity, despite … More Sargon and Enheduana – A Powerful Akkadian Family

Unrestricted Submarine Warfare and Famous Sinking’s in WW1

As historian Ben-Yehuda states 1915 was the year in which the concept of unrestricted submarine warfare was first applied. Despite it not being a formal policy until two years later the shift towards this type of warfare was to have a profound effect on World War One and beyond. On the 18th February 1915 Germany … More Unrestricted Submarine Warfare and Famous Sinking’s in WW1

A 5000 Year Old Pyramid City: Caral, Peru

This month we are investigating a non-European pre-modern civilisation and I took some time to research a topic that really gripped my interest. Usually in Europe the founding of civilisation is kept within the confines of Egypt, China, India and Mesopotamia when studying academic history. Very few universities offer modules that look into the deeper … More A 5000 Year Old Pyramid City: Caral, Peru

And the Ground Shook in London – 1750 “Year of Earthquakes”

Today I am sharing with you something I was very intrigued by and surprised to find about. I am talking about a series of earthquakes that took place in the UK and that in their own way had an incredible contribution to the world of modern science. As most of you may know, the UK … More And the Ground Shook in London – 1750 “Year of Earthquakes”

Burial Practices in Early Medieval Northern Europe

Today we are going to talk about something that my archaeology friends find fascinating, and most other humanist consider as particularly gross – the dead. Death is a key moment in anyones existence – dare I say The Most Crucial? But it can be quite a nasty and blunt topic to discuss. Nevertheless, in the … More Burial Practices in Early Medieval Northern Europe