Britain was never the soul of Will-Why do Shakespeare’s plays gravitate abroad?

The Bard, The Sweet Swan of Avon, The Immortal, The National Bard of England and An Upstart Crow… Yet three quarters of his plays delved into the comical theatrics of lands further afield, Why? The Merry Wives of Windsor being the only play in contemporary setting was an intended piece of satire published in 1602 … More Britain was never the soul of Will-Why do Shakespeare’s plays gravitate abroad?

What is an English identity? Some final thoughts on why I love and study History

Welcome to my final historical blog post. I cannot believe I have written over 30 posts in just over two years! It has been great fun and I hope they have all been informative and helpful. This post will focus on what motivates the historian, and why it is important to study. I will also … More What is an English identity? Some final thoughts on why I love and study History

Towns at War: Technological Advances in Artillery in Early Modern Period

Today I bring you something completely unlike me – warfare! I worked on this some time ago (2010 I believe), during my urban Europe studies, and for my surprise I really enjoyed it. I think the reason for that is because, even though it about warfare, my approach attempted to put things in context from … More Towns at War: Technological Advances in Artillery in Early Modern Period

The Invisible Contributors and Maintainers of Society

Until recently, history consisted only of men. The writers of history were mainly men, portraying history as being created and maintained by their fellow gender. Men always carried out the most important roles: they formed the armies, were preferred as the monarchs and took up the roles in government. It’s this disallowing of women to … More The Invisible Contributors and Maintainers of Society

We’ll Meet Again: The Breakdown of Family Relationships after World War Two

Featured Image taken from: Fashion-era.com. Image shows Bridal Party leaving the Church, in South Wales in 1947. When thinking of the World Wars and relationships, they are often thought of in two ways. The first, the strengthening of a bond after war because of what was nearly lost. The second, women widowed because her boyfriend, lover … More We’ll Meet Again: The Breakdown of Family Relationships after World War Two

First World War and Conscription: The Conscientious Objector

The First World War was the first use of compulsory military service in Britain, when in January 1916 the Military Service Bill was passed, and all men aged 18-41 – apart from those in certain professions, or medically unfit – were expected to be involved in military service. Early sign-ups for the war they thought would … More First World War and Conscription: The Conscientious Objector

Medieval Graffiti: the boredom of choirboys?

From Winchester Cathedral to the Rosslyn Chapel, the walls of Britain’s religious houses echo with the voices of a long-dead past. But why is medieval graffiti so commonplace? And what does it mean for modern historians? In a recent article for History Extra, Jessica Hope explores various meanings behind the countless examples of graffiti which … More Medieval Graffiti: the boredom of choirboys?