Carolingian Church Reform? A Re-evaluation of the Renovatio of the 8th and 9th Centuries

Today we are going to talk about something intrinsically linked with my second favourite Renaissance (Yes, you hear me correctly…) – The Carolingian Renaissance and the impact this had in the constitution of the Church. Again in the revisionist fashion of my posts-of-late, I will be re-evaluating this process, and explore it in a way … More Carolingian Church Reform? A Re-evaluation of the Renovatio of the 8th and 9th Centuries

Was the Devil important to early modern England?

Was Hell that prominent during early modern England? The supernatural was a subject which was wholly believed during the medieval and early modern period. God and Religion would be the people’s savior from Satan and his many demons. The modern perception of this belief would suggest that late medieval to early modern England was a … More Was the Devil important to early modern England?

Interview with Dr. Christina Welch (2/3)

In this interview feature we will be looking at Cultural Appropriation, artefacts in museums, religion, witchcraft and gender (with a particular focus on the elderly). This post follows from the previous post about Dr. Welch’s research and teaching. This is a part two (2) of three (3) interview with Dr. Christina Welch. Gentle reminder that … More Interview with Dr. Christina Welch (2/3)

Interview with Dr. Christina Welch (1/3)

In this interview feature we will be looking at Dr. Christina Welch’s research and academic interests. Dr. Welch is a Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Winchester. It will chart a variety of questions detailing Welch’s background, what she does at the University and … More Interview with Dr. Christina Welch (1/3)

The Schism of 1054

Due to the reading I have been doing recently I wanted to write something about the schism of the church in 1054. The schism has been widely written about over the past several decades, but I find it still interesting to research. First, some basic facts about the period. In 1054 there were several major … More The Schism of 1054

Medieval Graffiti: the boredom of choirboys?

From Winchester Cathedral to the Rosslyn Chapel, the walls of Britain’s religious houses echo with the voices of a long-dead past. But why is medieval graffiti so commonplace? And what does it mean for modern historians? In a recent article for History Extra, Jessica Hope explores various meanings behind the countless examples of graffiti which … More Medieval Graffiti: the boredom of choirboys?

Reform or Monastic Revival? An Insight into the Tenth Century English Church

After my row of updates on prehistoric and ancient times, I have decided to go back to my educational roots: early medieval history. In my early years at university, most of research and essay work focused on ecclesiastical history and the believes of people all over Europe. I think it was a subject I felt … More Reform or Monastic Revival? An Insight into the Tenth Century English Church

George Whitefield :18th century celebrity, Oh and a preacher!

Welcome to another 18th century bibliography on probably the most important or at least one of the most famous people of his time.  He was known to at least Eighty per cent of the population in the American colonies, he attracted crowds of 30,000, with his highest being 100,000 people in one place.  So who … More George Whitefield :18th century celebrity, Oh and a preacher!

The hard way to Heavens: Dialogues des Carmelites, Poulenc achieves immortality.

Now, you think about opera and something epic comes to mind. You think about French composers and something beautiful but somehow light is expected. You think about nuns and silence and boredom are words that could come to mind. Not that nuns are usually welcome as great historical characters. You think about Francois Poulenc and … More The hard way to Heavens: Dialogues des Carmelites, Poulenc achieves immortality.