First World War and Conscription: The Conscientious Objector

The First World War was the first use of compulsory military service in Britain, when in January 1916 the Military Service Bill was passed, and all men aged 18-41, later increased to 50 – apart from those in certain professions such as ministers of a religion, or medically unfit – were expected to be involved in … More First World War and Conscription: The Conscientious Objector

Political Unrest in Russia: The Abdication of Nicholas II

Nikolai Aleksandrovich, known as Tsar Nicholas II, was the last Russian Emperor and a member of the illustrious Romanov dynasty that had sat on the imperial throne since the early seventeenth century. Born on the 18th of May in Tsarskoye Selo, now Pushkin, Nicholas was born to rule only to die in a bloody revolution … More Political Unrest in Russia: The Abdication of Nicholas II

Unrestricted Submarine Warfare and Famous Sinking’s in WW1

As historian Ben-Yehuda states 1915 was the year in which the concept of unrestricted submarine warfare was first applied. Despite it not being a formal policy until two years later the shift towards this type of warfare was to have a profound effect on World War One and beyond. On the 18th February 1915 Germany … More Unrestricted Submarine Warfare and Famous Sinking’s in WW1

The Zimmerman Telegram-The Provocateur’s Poorly Perpetrated Ploy

When President Woodrow Wilson implored congress for a “war to end all wars” that would “make the world safe for democracy,” he made reference to the incursion upon United States neutrality in the German Empire’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare. Such warfare had has its incitation’s of military intervention in Europe overruled by Anti-War lobbies … More The Zimmerman Telegram-The Provocateur’s Poorly Perpetrated Ploy