July, 1916: Medical Shortcomings at the Somme

The 1st of July, 1916 marked the beginning of The Somme Offensive, one of the bloodiest battles in history. On the first day alone, 57,000 casualties were sustained by British Forces, a figure significantly higher than the predicted 10,000. Peter Barton, speaking in a recent documentary for the BBC (The Somme 1916- From Both Sides … More July, 1916: Medical Shortcomings at the Somme

Interview with Stardust Years owner, Karen Fitzsimmons.

Stardust Years is a brilliantly unique shop on the Winchester High Street, specialising in vintage and historical fashion items. I recently had the pleasure of visiting the shop for the first time and at once fell in love with the beautiful items on display. After my visit, I approached the owner Karen Fitzsimmons, and she … More Interview with Stardust Years owner, Karen Fitzsimmons.

“Dress suitably in short skirts … and buy a revolver”: The role of women in The Easter Rising of 1916

As we mark the centenary of The Easter Rising, a recent article by Olivia O’Leary for The Guardian lead me to consider the involvement of women in the conflict, and on the involvement of the aristocrat-turned-rebel, Countess Markievicz in particular. … More “Dress suitably in short skirts … and buy a revolver”: The role of women in The Easter Rising of 1916

#WhatVegansAte

Modern fad or bloodless revolution? I look at the surprising history of vegetarianism, veganism and the compassionate diet in the West.             Veganism is defined by The Vegan Society as ‘a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practical, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for … More #WhatVegansAte

Angel in the castle? Queen Victoria and female sexuality in the nineteenth century.

‘How repressed were the Victorians?’ asks a recent article for The British Library. Writing a convincing case for a reassessment of Victorian sexuality, Dr Holly Furneaux challenges our assumptions about Victorian attitudes to sex, while considering the many ways in which theorists such as Michel Foucault have provided ‘new ways of understanding sex and sexuality … More Angel in the castle? Queen Victoria and female sexuality in the nineteenth century.

Medieval Graffiti: the boredom of choirboys?

From Winchester Cathedral to the Rosslyn Chapel, the walls of Britain’s religious houses echo with the voices of a long-dead past. But why is medieval graffiti so commonplace? And what does it mean for modern historians? In a recent article for History Extra, Jessica Hope explores various meanings behind the countless examples of graffiti which … More Medieval Graffiti: the boredom of choirboys?