Sargon and Enheduana – A Powerful Akkadian Family

In a 1931 archaeological dig in Nineveh, in Northern Mesopotamia, a life-sized copper head was found by Reginald Thompson and Max Mallowan. This head signalled a change from the usual hieratic sculpture style that denoted the Sumerians. It was also noted that this head did not show any of the usual signs of divinity, despite … More Sargon and Enheduana – A Powerful Akkadian Family

Unrestricted Submarine Warfare and Famous Sinking’s in WW1

As historian Ben-Yehuda states 1915 was the year in which the concept of unrestricted submarine warfare was first applied. Despite it not being a formal policy until two years later the shift towards this type of warfare was to have a profound effect on World War One and beyond. On the 18th February 1915 Germany … More Unrestricted Submarine Warfare and Famous Sinking’s in WW1

A 5000 Year Old Pyramid City: Caral, Peru

This month we are investigating a non-European pre-modern civilisation and I took some time to research a topic that really gripped my interest. Usually in Europe the founding of civilisation is kept within the confines of Egypt, China, India and Mesopotamia when studying academic history. Very few universities offer modules that look into the deeper … More A 5000 Year Old Pyramid City: Caral, Peru

And the Ground Shook in London – 1750 “Year of Earthquakes”

Today I am sharing with you something I was very intrigued by and surprised to find about. I am talking about a series of earthquakes that took place in the UK and that in their own way had an incredible contribution to the world of modern science. As most of you may know, the UK … More And the Ground Shook in London – 1750 “Year of Earthquakes”

Burial Practices in Early Medieval Northern Europe

Today we are going to talk about something that my archaeology friends find fascinating, and most other humanist consider as particularly gross – the dead. Death is a key moment in anyones existence – dare I say The Most Crucial? But it can be quite a nasty and blunt topic to discuss. Nevertheless, in the … More Burial Practices in Early Medieval Northern Europe

Early Modern Discovery

Looking back at this day in 1493 the Portuguese-born discoverer Christopher Columbus mistook manatees for mermaids when he sailed near the Dominican Republic. He reports seeing three “mermaids” and describes them as “not half as beautiful as they are painted.” In the history of the discovery of new lands, there can be seen a pattern … More Early Modern Discovery

The Thracian Step Pyramid near Kovil (Bulgaria)

Here I bring you a quick update on a relatively recent archaeological discovery that has taken my interest. I am talking about the Thracian rock pyramid researched by Vassil Markov and his team of archaeologists. Markov is the head of the university research centre for ancient european and eastern mediterranean cultures at Bulgaria’s south-west university. … More The Thracian Step Pyramid near Kovil (Bulgaria)

The Zimmerman Telegram-The Provocateur’s Poorly Perpetrated Ploy

When President Woodrow Wilson implored congress for a “war to end all wars” that would “make the world safe for democracy,” he made reference to the incursion upon United States neutrality in the German Empire’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare. Such warfare had has its incitation’s of military intervention in Europe overruled by Anti-War lobbies … More The Zimmerman Telegram-The Provocateur’s Poorly Perpetrated Ploy

Medieval Warfare Vol. VI, Issue 6 Review – January/February 2017

Late last year I got the opportunity to read an advance issue of Medieval Warfare and since it was a chance to keep up to date with different historical literature since graduation I was delighted. A couple of issues were sent to W.U.HSTRY and Lilly (W.U.HSTRY ruler) sent this one over to me as it … More Medieval Warfare Vol. VI, Issue 6 Review – January/February 2017